9 Must Ask Follow-up Questions in Interviews

9 Must Ask Follow-up Questions in Interviews

According to a new research by Harvard Business School professors Alison Wood Brooks, Karen Huang, Michael Yeomans, Julia Minson, and Francesca Gino, people who ask follow-up questions are perceived as higher in responsiveness, an interpersonal construct that captures listening, understanding, validation, and care. Here are 9 follow-up questions you can ask.

Five principles of designing experiences

Five principles of designing experiences

Designers need to design with empathy. That means giving up one’s prior knowledge of the subject and looking at it with the eyes of a novice to understand the feelings of a user. This is easier said than done. Observing people in their natural surroundings is a good starting point. But don’t do it like a tourist. Instead immerse yourself in that world.

Did you inherit the job from your parents

Did you inherit the job from your parents

The New York Times ran a study on the jobs we are most likely to inherit from the mother or father. In their study they found that males are 2.7 times likely to share dad’s profession. Males are two times likely to share their mother’s profession. Daughters are 1.8 times likely to follow dad and 1.7 times likely to follow their mother. Parents certainly shape our view of work. It is no surprise that the children of parents who were unemployed are more likely to be unsure of the profession they would choose.

Millennials Love Makeup & Influencers

Millennials Love Makeup & Influencers

The media consuming habits of millennials is heavily tilted in favor of visual communication – but not every form of visuals matter. #Millennials get bored watching a 30 second commercial but can spend hours on YouTube video tutorials for make up. They spend hours on Instagram. Learning to communicate on Instagram (it has a different grammar, trust me) will be useful.

How To Hire Someone Who Is Not Good at Communicating

How To Hire Someone Who Is Not Good at Communicating

Although most of us spend more time communicating online than offline, recruitment methods are still heavily skewed towards analogue or physical communication skills, particularly the job interview. Indeed, interviews favor those who can communicate their ideas fluently and come across as likable. How can we discover talented people who are not good at communicating but are otherwise terrific at delivering top-notch performance?

The Digital Tsunami: Talent Management

The Digital Tsunami: Talent Management

When the entire talent pool consists of a few thousand people in the world, the demand and supply equation does get skewed in favor of the experts. In case of Artificial Intelligence, the talent pool is limited to less than 10,000 people across the world. These people are being tapped by everyone from Google, Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Microsoft as well as every other industry. The MD of Daimler Benz recently said their competitors are no longer other car companies like Tesla, but Google, Apple, Amazon etc. The same holds true for talent. If Artificial Intelligence is on its way to becoming like electricity, there are not enough electrical engineers being churned out.

Hit Refresh by Satya Nadella

Hit Refresh by Satya Nadella

Hit Refresh (publisher: Harper Collins) is a book that is the blueprint Nadella has in mind as he tries to change the culture of Microsoft from know-it-all to learn-it-all. The new culture at Microsoft is all about listening, learning more and talking less. The book is a terrific study in changing culture. Nadella’s decision to launch Windows 10 in Kenya instead of Sydney was an effort to build a culture of inclusion. Both countries have educated and tech savvy customers as well as skill gaps. Building a culture that obsesses about the customer is not easy.

Weak Relationships With Industry Hurts MBAs

The MBA degree was created for a different world. It was the mid-sixties when having an MBA first began to catch the imagination of the middle class aspirants. It was the guarantee of a good life. But that was also when the average tenure of companies on the S&P 500 was 33 years. By 1990, organization’s lifespans had shrunk to 20 years. By 2026 the lifespan of a company would […]

How to build more curiosity

How to build more curiosity

Curiosity matters. Human beings are born curious. The baby’s eyes wander all over even as he/she is a few days old. They are trying to make sense of the new environment that they have entered. This quest continues even as they grow older. They bombard the older people around with questions. Some questions are simple. “Why do the stars twinkle?” <see if your answer matches an astronomer’s> Curious people are […]

How Office Politics Corrupts the Search for High-Potential Employees

How Office Politics Corrupts the Search for High-Potential Employees

Few topics have captivated talent management discussions more intensely than potential. But how good are we at evaluating human potential? The answer is, it’s mixed. In the real world of work, organizational practices lag behind, with 40% of designated “HiPos” — high-potential employees — not doing well in the future and at least one in two leaders disappointing, derailing, or failing to drive high levels of engagement and team performance. Despite the tools being available, political processes derail how talent is identified in organizations.

Binge Learning – is that even a thing?

Binge Learning - is that even a thing?

Pyschologists will explain this as Goal Gradient effect. We start to hurry up and put in more effort as we get closer to the finishing line. While doing push ups, try counting backwards 10… 9… 8… instead of the usual 1… 2… 3… and see how how it affects your motivation. Rats run faster as they approach a food reward. Humans increase effort as they approach rewards such as gift certificates or goals such as visual finish lines.

Why are Digital Giants Building Offices

Why are Digital Giants Building Offices

There are enough people who earn a living without stepping into an office. A wartime correspondent can get a Pulitzer without being in office for months. A job that can be done with no interdependencies can be done from anywhere. The gig economy is proof of that.
However, deeper bonds are formed between people who cross each other several times a day. In the late 1940s, psychologists Leon Festinger and Stanley Schachter, and sociologist Kurt Back found that physical space was the key to friendship formation.
In a hyperconnected world, the notion of friendship is acquiring new shades. Online friendships are being formed on social media over shared interests. Whether these friends could work together on a day-to-day basis on tasks remains to be studied.